Posts Tagged ‘trainwreck’

angieHi, white ladies! Oh my god, you all look so cute. I love your dresses, are they vintage? OK, here’s the deal. Ever since I watched Trainwreck three times I can’t stop thinking about the ways that we (white feminists) keep throwing black people under the bus.

Why, why, why, when we are finally getting the opportunity to tell our own stories in our own voices are we turning around and deliberately using black people the way white men’s stories have always used us?

In Trainwreck, Amy Schumer goes out of her way to create a flawed, deep, complex female character for herself, and then for no discernable reason, adds this scene where she is on the subway when it stops in the tunnel. She asks the black woman next to her “why is it stopped?” and gets a classic Angry Black Woman response, something like “Do I look like the MTA to you? Do I have metrocards coming out my ass?” We never see the woman again, Amy gets where she’s going on time, there is literally no reason for this scene to be in the movie except that it is hilarious how black woman are always angrier than a situation warrants.

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trainwreck

I think this is right. –ed

Cara is a humourless man-hating American feminist artist. Harriet is a humorless man-hating British feminist PhD Candidate. Here, they discuss their reactions to Amy Schumer’s Trainwreck.

Harriet:

Yes, ok, so I enjoyed how Amy isn’t “nice” in the way we tend to expect female characters to be “nice”–she has complicated feelings about her aging, bigoted, father, she’s relentlessly mocking of her sister’s family, she pursues her own agenda when it comes to one-night-stands.

Cara:

I think what I really like is that she’s not only “not nice,” she’s also capable of being really nice, as she is to her dad. She takes care to preserve his things and visit him at the home. She loves her sister, even though she’s awful at showing it. She’s conscientious about not stealing the article that her co worker wants to work on.

Harriet:

Yeah, so although she’s not always as generous, or as malleable (struggling to find the right word here) in social/romantic/familial situations as we might expect, we’re still on her side. She escapes without being cast as the bitch (Tilda Swinton fulfills that role, just in case we’d forgotten what it looks like).

Cara

Fair. Let’s not be bitchless.

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